Politician vs Public Servant and the Key to Great Leadership

Do you want to know the difference between a Mediocre and a Great Leader?

First, let’s start with a question…

Are you a politician or a public servant?

What’s the difference?

It’s simple: Public servants put the interests of those they serve ahead of their own. Politicians, on the other hand, put their own interests ahead of those they serve.

Politicians frame leadership success in terms of wins and losses—whether it’s a debate, an election, or a short-term political battle.

As the former U.S. Senator and Governor of Arkansas James Paul Clark once famously said,

A politician thinks of the next election; a statesmen of the next generation.

And it’s the same with leaders of organizations. A mediocre leader thinks of the next short-term win. A great leader thinks of the organization’s long-term health.

But here’s the thing: Politicians aren’t confined to the political arena. There are politicians in organizations who care more about accomplishing their personal agenda than their company’s mission. There are politicians in the marketplace who think only of the next business deal or quarterly earnings report—not the good of their team.

Public servants, on the other hand, work tirelessly for the good of those they serve. Unlike politicians, public servants don’t sacrifice the good of their followers on the altar of their own ambition.

They put the next generation ahead of the next election, the good of their team ahead of their agenda, and the success of the cause ahead of their own success.

At core, the Humble for President campaign is about turning politicians into public servants again.

Want to help us make the happen?

Go to www.HumbleForPresident.com, and consider joining, volunteering or donating to the campaign. If you agree with this idea, you can also help spread the word by sharing this post with others.

We need your voice as we try to encourage politicians to become public servants again.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.